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Make it Work

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You end your first week of the new semester with a dilemma. One student in your online class shared that she has a visual impairment. You wonder what you can do so the student has what she needs to access the content and participate in the class. She has provided a letter from the disability services office regarding her accommodations, but those are for a traditional, in-person course. What can you do to accommodate this student in an online course?

https://iteachu.uaf.edu/sharing-the-responsibility-of-accessibility-tt/

Using the principals of universal design, which applies to both the physical and online classroom, instructors can make the course better for students of all abilities.

Equitable use – The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.
Flexibility in use – The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.
Simple and intuitive use – Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level.
Perceptible information – The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities.
Tolerance for error – The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions.
Low physical effort – The design can be used efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of fatigue.
Size and space for approach and use – Appropriate size and space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of user’s body size, posture, or mobility.

From iTeachu, Principals of Universal Design
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